Temp and RH controller for 11$!?!


Just getting into how it works but looka like a he'll of a find if it does what it says.
My plan is to automate a fungi greenhouse that is shared,by 2 4x4 and a 3x3 veg closet.
I believe 80% for the fruiting phase of mushrooms. And 50% for the flower side. Of the room.
Check it out. All u automaters! @Deebs @SSGrower
 

Deebs

The Sentient Naturewalker
Staff member
Moderator
Interesting. Might have to check that out. I went the easy route with inkbirds, humidity controller for cool mist, and temp controller to keep me between 70-75F, some say temp can be even lower.

I kept RH around 92-95 for fruiting fyi.. just need good FAE..I threw a fan in there to cycle at 5m every 4h on the timer. Also cool mist adds fae as long as you run it outside the tent.

Just some cubensis paramaters from Ott and Oeric, and TMC. Full ebook in resources, among others.

GROWTH PARAMETERS
Mycelial Types:
Rhizomorphic to linear; whitish in overall color but often bruising bluish where injured.
Standard Spawn Medium: Rye grain. See Chapter III.
Fruiting Substrate: Rye grain; wheat straw; leached horse or cow manure; and/or horse manure/straw compost balanced to a 71-74% moisture content.
Method of Preparation: See Chapters Ill, V, and VI. Pasteurization achieved through exposure to live steam for 2 hours at 1 40°F. throughout the substrate. Straw or compost should be filled to a depth of 6-1 2 inches. Straw should be spawned at a rate of 2 cups/sq. ft.

Spawn Run:
Relative Humidity
: 90%.
Substrate Temperature: 84-86 °F. Thermal death limits have been established at 106°F.
Duration: 10-14 days.
C02: 5000-10,000 ppm.
Fresh Air Exchanges: 0 per hour.
Type of Casing: After fully run, cover with the standard casing.. Layer to a depth of 1 -2 inches. The casing should be balanced to an initial pH of 6.8-7.2.

Post Casing/Prepinning:
Relative Humidity
: 90+ %.
Substrate Temperature: 84-86 °F.
Duration of Case Run: 5-10 days.
C02: 5000-10,000 ppm.
Fresh Air Exchanges: 0 per hour.
Light: Incubation in total darkness.

Primordia Formation:
Relative Humidity
: 95-100%.
Air Temperature: 74-78 °F.
Duration: 6-10 days.
C02: less than 5000 ppm.
Fresh Air Exchanges: 1 -3 per hour.
Light: Diffuse natural or exposure for 1 2-1 6 hours/day of grow-lux type fluorescent light high in blue spectra at the 480 nanometer wavelength.

Cropping:
Relative Humidity: 85-92%.
Air Temperature: 74-78 °F.
C02: less than 5000 ppm.
Fresh Air Exchanges: 1 -3 per hour.
Flushing Pattern: Every 5-8 days.
Harvest Stage: When the cap becomes convex and soon after the partial veil ruptures.
Light: Indirect natural or same as above.
Yield Potential: Average yields are 2-4 lbs./sqft, over a 5 week cropping period. Maximum yield potential has not been established.
Moisture Content of Mushrooms: 92% water; 8% dry matter.
Nutritional Content: Not yet established.
Comments: One of the easiest mushrooms to grow, this species fruits on a wide variety of substrates within broad environmental parameters. As a primary and secondary decomposer, Psilocybe cubensis fruits well on untreated pasteurized straw and on horse manure/straw composts transformed by microbial activity. Sterilized grain typically produces smaller mushrooms than bulk substrates. Given the numerous substrates that support fruitings, Psilocybe cubensis is well suited for home cultivation. Psilocybe cubensis cultivation was unheard of twenty years ago. Today, this species ranks amongst one of the most commonly cultivated mushrooms in the U.S. and soon the world. This sudden escalation in interest is largely due to the publication of several popular guides illustrating techniques for its culture. Psilocybe cubensis is a mushroom with psychoactive properties, containing up to 1 % psilocybin and/or psilocin per dried gram. The function of these serotonin-like compounds in the life cycle of the mushroom is not known.
Genetic Characteristics: Basidia tetrapolar (4-spored), forming haploid spores (1 N); heterothallic. The mating of compatible monokaryons often results in fruiting strains. Clamp connections are present.
 
Those DS18B20 sensors are extremely cheap and can be off by quite a bit so make sure it is accurate before you rely on one. I've worked with these sensors pretty extensively while trying to find something inexpensive that I can use with my control system. The one-wire protocol is dead simple, but I've specifically had issues with the RH being off by a fair amount. I currently refer to my AC Infinity sensor for accurate readings because it lines up with other sensors I use to compare, but I do have a DS18B20 in my tent right next to it that I poll for values that I use to turn my humidifier on and off. It worked great for a few months and then I started to notice some massive drifts with the RH values it was reporting. I replaced the sensor with a new one and that one was also off by a fair amount. The issue with this is the amount it is off differes based on the air temperature in the tent. So you really can't just add or subtract from the reported RH. I currently am just correcting the value in my programming by subtracting 6% from what my sensor is reporting, which works for the most part, but if my tent gets out of the 78°-83° range the value isn't correct.
 
Those DS18B20 sensors are extremely cheap and can be off by quite a bit so make sure it is accurate before you rely on one. I've worked with these sensors pretty extensively while trying to find something inexpensive that I can use with my control system. The one-wire protocol is dead simple, but I've specifically had issues with the RH being off by a fair amount. I currently refer to my AC Infinity sensor for accurate readings because it lines up with other sensors I use to compare, but I do have a DS18B20 in my tent right next to it that I poll for values that I use to turn my humidifier on and off. It worked great for a few months and then I started to notice some massive drifts with the RH values it was reporting. I replaced the sensor with a new one and that one was also off by a fair amount. The issue with this is the amount it is off differes based on the air temperature in the tent. So you really can't just add or subtract from the reported RH. I currently am just correcting the value in my programming by subtracting 6% from what my sensor is reporting, which works for the most part, but if my tent gets out of the 78°-83° range the value isn't correct.
Good to,know! So the 40$ rainbird is more accurate?
 
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