2024 Outdoor Vegetable Garden

OldG

Elite Hobbyist

What a GREAT idea. 20 bucks Canadian and they send you 9 packs of vegetables seeds that really thrive in Southwestern Ontario.
Got me itching for outdoors. Feb 1 is very close.... March 1.... i might start some seeds for outside. It takes 2 months for peppers and maters right ???!!!!!! :D

2024 Outdoor. The Bob and Doug McKenzie grow !
  • Bean - Pike Bush Bean
  • Tomato - Bonny Best
  • Lettuce - Buttercrunch
  • Beet - Detroit Dark Red
  • Pea - Homesteader
  • Pepper - California Wonder
  • Cucumber - Marketmore 76
  • Carrot - Scarlet Nantes
  • Zucchini - Black Beauty
110555233_10158358907792777_3746125042675329066_n.jpg
 

OldG

Elite Hobbyist
We are a month from tomato starts

I am getting the 4 x 8 ready....time we are half way to spring

Peppers i start later today

Jalapenos because i made 3 jars of red jalapeno peppers and they are like you put boiling water in your mouth HOT.... I cant take it but wow some hot heads love it.
California Wonder ALL OVER
Habeneros
 

belleswell

In Bloom
I also have been doing some gardening chores before tilling. Things like pruning a dozen
fruit trees, pruning a raspberry briar patch that's about 15' x 60'. The raspberries that we put
in took up about half the space they now occupy. They are easy to take cuttings from to
grow more, which is why the size has doubled.

As an added bonus this year is a local bee keeper that sets his hives on properties that have potential for a good
harvest of honey. We've been on a waiting list for a couple years. The 3 1/2 acre yard that I purposely let the
dandelions go to maturity before mowing the first time, the size of the garden, and the fruit trees were all
incentive for the bee keeper to plant a couple hives here. Great for pollination of the garden and all of the free honey and
then some from him after he harvests the honey. A friend we know lives about a mile away and has two of his hives on her
property and he gives her over a years supply of honey for allowing him to tend the hives. Win/win

Our entire garden is 60' x 120' and we decided after our first garden here 6 years ago
that it was too large for the two of us. So we put in 9 varieties of apple trees,
a couple of peach trees, and a couple cherry trees. All need pruning badly as their growth
the last couple years has been through the roof. We have so much extra beyond what we can
or freeze that my wife sells off our excess on Saturdays at our small town farmers market.

I will be spreading a bunch of manure and compost from our compost pile that will be tilled
in a couple of months.


We let quite a few of our veggies go to seed and then dry them out and use them the following year.
We can enough jam from our berries to get us through the year.

The same with our apples. We are still eating potatoes from last years harvest although some are
getting decent runners on them sitting in our fruit cellar and those will be cut up and used for
another row or two of potatoes.


The garden fabric we put in a couple years ago really made a difference in our yield. Weeding time
is also cut back to a tolerable level as well. Along with the garden fabric which I move each year
to expose new ground and cover up the rows that were used last year. The garden fabric was
complemented with drip tape irrigation.

Getting the garden in start to finish takes us around 2 or 3 weeks. It's work. I have a small Honda
Mantis tiller for working around the veggies and a Big Red Horse Tiller for tilling the manure and
compost into the garden. I also have an older John Deere 750 with a tiller attachment, but because I have to
tear down all of the fencing to use it, I choose to take a little longer and use Big Red or the Mantis tillers.

All of our saved egg shells and coffee grounds get spread around the up starts.


I use my 4x5 for early starters indoors. Things like Brussels sprouts, all kinds of melons, broccoli,
red and green cabbages, onions, and tomatoes. One thing I do to keep the young watermelon plants from getting eaten
is to cut the bottom off a one gallon milk jug. Leaving the lid on, I cut some slits and enlarge them
a little near the top just under the lid. I then keep them covered until they outgrow it. Once the milk
jugs come off the young melon plants, they are usually large enough to avoid being on the menu from the
browsing critters.


Another trick we use for strawberries is to put some small rocks painted to look like strawberries.
The rabbits find them tough to swallow. Better yet, last year we put up some hoops cut from rebar that is
used between layers of block for masonry work. They are made like a ladder and made in different widths
for different sizes of block. I cut the 10 foot sections of these into two 5 foot sections . We found
these at Menards. After the hoops are in we cover the entire row with 1" mesh plastic fencing and
that keeps the rabbits from getting all of them. Out witting the critters sometimes takes some effort.
To save our peaches last year, I live trapped 11 raccoons as they can empty a tree in one night. We're
still eating peach jam. The work is worth the rewards imo as the time spent growing them makes all of
them taste better.



Three of four varieties of squash. Acorn squash is one of our faves and they keep well in our fruit cellar.
We had about 72 in a couple boxes 2 years ago and that was too many, although we were still eating them
through February and last year we only had a couple dozen and they've been gone for over month now.
I'm thinking about 50 of them year will be just right.


Tomatoes are another where we grow multiple varieties and can up a bunch. My wife sells off the extras at
the farmers market.


Peas and Beans . Peas get two full rows and beans get one row.


Pumpkins. I tried a new variety last year called Lady Godiva pumpkins which produce a hull less seed
called a Pepita. Pumpkin seeds without the shell. The sugar pie variety, and the normal ones are all
used for making pumpkin seeds in the oven with butter and a little sea salt to taste when done.


Peppers galore. From Bell peppers to some hot varieties for salsa we probably grow around a dozen varieties.
We also have 4 hanging baskets that attach to the rail of our deck that are all about 3 foot long. We grow
herbs and leaf lettuce in those. I even bought some potato fabric bags similar to ones use for weed, but they
have Velcro pocket sized patches on the side that lets one check the progress of the taters knowing when it's
time to pick them.


We planted a couple of Nanking Cherries bushes and a couple of Red Currant bushes 4 years ago and they
finally produced fruit last year. I was wondering if they were ever going to produce.

Black and Red Raspberries and Blueberries. With all of these anti-oxidants, we were in real danger of running out of regular oxidants.


Pics.

7Oi86nbh.jpg


We had a bumper crop of most everything in our garden the last couple years.
A combination of the right weather, the garden fabric and the drip tape
irrigation. The fabric and drip tape were new additions to the garden
two years ago and it made a huge difference. Less time weeding and the harvest
has been amazing.

My wife sold some of her artwork and the excess veggies we
grew at the farmers market in town on Saturdays. We had way too many zucchinis,
tomatoes, and peppers. If we still lived in the city we would be leaving bags
of these on our neighbors porches, ringing their doorbell and running away
v5oM5O5h.jpg



Garden Goodies - We had our best year ever in our garden last year
sYdBadph.jpg


ZQAICZZh.jpg


FN4vl2oh.jpg


uLEByjZh.jpg


gV9Q89Mh.jpg


Salsa Peppers
zZdy3S7h.jpg




Zucchini's are another one that we grow a couple of varieties of.
I was going to pick a few of these and decided to wait one more day.
On the following day it rained hard all day. I went out after the rain day
and these zuccs had gone from normal sized to jumbos in the course of two days.

My wife jokingly said, "Girth and length". I laughed.
AkhM8pzh.jpg


1Ypbhzfh.jpg


3YsauPjh.jpg



IL4aewqh.jpg


The lesson to be learned is this. When the zuccs are getting close,
check them everyday, and not every other day.

Red Cabbage
KuBC5cYh.jpg


Watermelons
NEOxLSqh.jpg



Pumpkin seeds
tQB9ohth.jpg


Seeds for the following year - We save a few from each of the veggies

mI4Okumh.jpg


Raspberries - Both Red and Black
lCQzsaeh.jpg



We had over 20 5 gallon buckets of apples that we pressed for
cider, and then canned a bunch of apples and applesauce.
Last year we gave away about 6 or 7 bushels of apples and my wife probably
sold as many at the farmers market.
ZQAICZZh.jpg


CW9Mdd8h.jpg


uxwmOzzh.jpg



 
Last edited:

belleswell

In Bloom
Please post any gardening tips that you may have as I'm always
looking for suggestions for a better harvest.


More Garden Goodies
SmQ4Z8Qh.jpg


Nanking Cherries - Great Jam
fM6C3Swh.jpg


Red Currants also made into jam.
itrFGnMh.jpg


Raspberries - Both Red and Black
lCQzsaeh.jpg



SmQ4Z8Qh.jpg


Blueberries
Early on
l6bTaYEh.jpg



pX53HZ8h.jpg



VUZ377Eh.jpg


A farmer friend gave me a good tip for getting my Brussels Sprouts to completion. That is to cut the top off the plant
once the sprouts are about the size of a pinky sized fingernail. The plant will put all of it's energy into sprout production.
Now they all get to normal size as opposed to the pathetically small specimens I had been producing. I kept hoping they would
put on some size before frost got to them. Nope. However topping them definitely works.


A trick that works for younger fruit trees that are prone to browsing by
our very large local deer herd. I hang a plastic grocery bag about at the height
of a deers head with a half a bar of Irish Springs regular scented soap. It
is a smell they do not like. I hang this bag with the soap in it on one of the lower
branches of each tree. I poke a few holes in the bottom of the plastic bag so the rain
water will not collect in them. I do this for for our fruit trees before the snow is gone
as the deer will browse on whatever they can this time of year.

I also use heavy duty duct taped wrapped around the base of the fruit trees with the
sticky side out. Usually about a foot or so of this tape wrapped around the base stops
those evil tent worms from setting up shop in one of the branches of the trees.


Peaches - Wrapped with 1" fence netting up to a height of 8' and
then a canopy of the same netting over the top to keep all of the critters and
birds away. The first year they produced and I lost all of them to
raccoons and birds. Not last year. Live traps and netting saved them.
w4EjUJth.jpg



hMKhvi8h.jpg



Strawberry painted rocks. Still hoops with netting that completely covers them
protects them from the pesky wabbits.
Ipamk6rh.jpg


Acorn Squash
4kDlTaRh.jpg



Spaghetti Squash on the right
Wrw7SGqh.jpg



Cantaloupe/Musk Melons
r8fksZYh.jpg



Potatoes
0JJUavBh.jpg


Peas mature quickly so I plant them 3 times during the course
of the season. The last planting will finish just before first frost.
FPGwi7zh.jpg


Assortment
ogZDJohh.jpg



jVet8Zqh.jpg



pcPqSzDh.jpg



Pumpkin seeds. We usually get enough to last a year or more.
TsTeg3th.jpg
 
Last edited:

danksdog

Stretching
Incredible harvests, I'd love to have something similar one day. I doubt you need much advice from the looks of it lol Not much I could give anyway.
Those speckled camo "Swan" gourds look awesome! Looks like some kind of squash.

I'd offer up some of my beans/lettuces/asian greens/herbs if anyone would be interested. These are grown in the southern US and most won't tolerate freezes. My cilantro just took temps around 17F without a hitch though, and half the greens made it np.
 

Willie

πŸ“ Crush Genetics πŸ“
what I grabbed at Fedco


254A β€” Velour Purple Filet Bush Haricots Vert, 1/2oz β€” 1 Γ— $3.75 = $3.75
1218A β€” Sassy Pickling Cucumber, 1g β€” 1 Γ— $3.00 = $3.00
1234A β€” Cross Country Pickling Cucumber, 1g β€” 1 Γ— $2.55 = $2.55
1239B β€” Little Leaf H-19 Organic Pickling Cucumber, 4g β€” 1 Γ— $6.25 = $6.25
1689B β€” Wig Out Waltham Butternut, 1/2oz β€” 1 Γ— $5.25 = $5.25
2805A β€” Bronze Mignonette Butterhead Lettuce, 1g β€” 1 Γ— $3.00 = $3.00
2992A β€” Mesclun Greens Mix, 1g β€” 1 Γ— $3.35 = $3.35
3034A β€” Perpetual Spinach Chard, 1/16oz β€” 1 Γ— $3.15 = $3.15
3222A β€” Tokyo Bekana Organic Chinese Cabbage, 1/16oz β€” 1 Γ— $3.25 = $3.25
3225A β€” Blues Chinese Cabbage, 250 seeds β€” 1 Γ— $4.65 = $4.65
3261A β€” Choko Pac Choi, 1/16oz β€” 1 Γ— $3.00 = $3.00
3270A β€” Prize Choy Organic Pac Choi, 1/16oz β€” 1 Γ— $3.50 = $3.50
3821A β€” Long Red Narrow Cayenne Hot Pepper, 0.25g β€” 1 Γ— $2.25 = $2.25
4053A β€” Black Prince Organic Slicing Tomato, 0.2g β€” 1 Γ— $3.30 = $3.30
4950A β€” Ruby Parfait Organic Celosia, 0.1g β€” 1 Γ— $2.75 = $2.75
:)
 

Willie

πŸ“ Crush Genetics πŸ“
Please post any gardening tips that you may have as I'm always
looking for suggestions for a better harvest.


More Garden Goodies
SmQ4Z8Qh.jpg


Nanking Cherries - Great Jam
fM6C3Swh.jpg


Red Currants also made into jam.
itrFGnMh.jpg


Raspberries - Both Red and Black
lCQzsaeh.jpg



SmQ4Z8Qh.jpg


Blueberries
Early on
l6bTaYEh.jpg



pX53HZ8h.jpg



VUZ377Eh.jpg


A farmer friend gave me a good tip for getting my Brussels Sprouts to completion. That is to cut the top off the plant
once the sprouts are about the size of a pinky sized fingernail. The plant will put all of it's energy into sprout production.
Now they all get to normal size as opposed to the pathetically small specimens I had been producing. I kept hoping they would
put on some size before frost got to them. Nope. However topping them definitely works.


A trick that works for younger fruit trees that are prone to browsing by
our very large local deer herd. I hang a plastic grocery bag about at the height
of a deers head with a half a bar of Irish Springs regular scented soap. It
is a smell they do not like. I hang this bag with the soap in it on one of the lower
branches of each tree. I poke a few holes in the bottom of the plastic bag so the rain
water will not collect in them. I do this for for our fruit trees before the snow is gone
as the deer will browse on whatever they can this time of year.

I also use heavy duty duct taped wrapped around the base of the fruit trees with the
sticky side out. Usually about a foot or so of this tape wrapped around the base stops
those evil tent worms from setting up shop in one of the branches of the trees.


Peaches - Wrapped with 1" fence netting up to a height of 8' and
then a canopy of the same netting over the top to keep all of the critters and
birds away. The first year they produced and I lost all of them to
raccoons and birds. Not last year. Live traps and netting saved them.
w4EjUJth.jpg



hMKhvi8h.jpg



Strawberry painted rocks. Still hoops with netting that completely covers them
protects them from the pesky wabbits.
Ipamk6rh.jpg


Acorn Squash
4kDlTaRh.jpg



Spaghetti Squash on the right
Wrw7SGqh.jpg
Beautiful produce! What is this green and white thing called. Is it a gourd?

pcPqSzDh.jpg


Also a pumpkin seed question....Do you brine them?
 

belleswell

In Bloom
Also a pumpkin seed question....Do you brine them?
Hi Willie. No brine. No soaking beforehand. I use the seeds from 2 pumpkins which at an average of 500 per pumpkin is about 1000 seeds. You can see this
two pumpkin amount on the cookie sheet pic, and in each of the food saver bags in the other pic.

I use about 2/3 to 3/4 of a stick of butter cut up into thin small pats and put on top of them when they go in the oven. I set the oven to 225 F , because much higher
than that, butter will burn. After a half hour, I will use a spatula to turn them, and another 20 minutes to a half hour later, I'm pulling them out of the oven. I keep an eye on
them toward the end to make sure I'm not letting them get over done. After they are done, I salt them with some sea salt to taste. I still have quite a few bags left
from last year. I could cut back the butter a little, but I enjoy the indulgence.



"Beautiful produce! What is this green and white thing called. Is it a gourd?"

The gourd in question is a speckled swan neck gourd. Purely decorative. I was wondering the same thing as I saw them in our garden for the first time.
I researched them a little on line and wondered why we were growing them if we can't eat them. She told be she threw a few in some flats when she was buying
some starter plants last spring because she thought they were pretty. In her defense, she did not know they were purely decorative.

After I found out, I went about pulling up around 4 or 5 plants that had runners going in all directions up to 40 feet. They were taking over and their tentacles had wrapped themselves around most every other veg plant in the garden. They were climbing our fruit trees at one end of our garden and getting tangled in our raspberry patch at the other end of our garden. The garden full length is 120 feet and 60 feet wide. The runners went in both directions for the 60 foot width and had runners in the fence on both sides. It took me a couple hours of unwinding their tentacles off everything. I have two huge compost piles that I throw stuff into. The one closest to the garden is where I dumped these things. They would not die. They kept growing for over a month. On the plus side, everybody loved them at the farmers market and my wife sold all of them. We had some smaller ones in the compost pile that grew from babies to fruition. I've never seen a plant keep going like they did once they were pulled out of the soil to where I was picking mature ones out of the compost pile a month after I tossed them there. The gourds were probably still surviving off the long vines. I'll never grow them again.
 
Last edited:

Willie

πŸ“ Crush Genetics πŸ“
Those gourds might make a stellar bong depending how they dry.
1707960644135.jpeg

mid_01564586_001.jpg

primitive-pipes-african-batonga-gourd-pipe-bong-pp-gor-1-14208491520074.jpg


I switched from salting to brining the pumpkin seeds a few years ago. It's pretty simple operation and the seeds come out pretty good. Worth trying one time. :)
 

Willie

πŸ“ Crush Genetics πŸ“
This is year 3 for asparagus..................which means I get to eat some hopefully. Strawberries went wild and this might be a big year. Last year was great.

At the tone ......πŸ”Š there are 570-600 garlics lurking out there.

I'm trying some new pickler cukes this year. The H-19 Little Leaf cukes in my list of seeds above are my defacto favorite. The other 2 are new.

The chinese cabbage and the Bok Choy are also new................hoping to feed this kimchi habit I have acquired :) But I'm not too lucky with brassicas here.

I got that Black Prince tomato whis is also new.......I have so many tomato seeds still in the box I am gonna try and make them work this year.

Currently eating dried tomatoes, garlic, garlic scapes from last years garden. Just finished the last butternut squash a week ago............will plant more of those next year....they are like guaranteed to make 2 squash a plant with little effort.

I'm ready for the gardening season :)
 

belleswell

In Bloom
Asparagus usually takes that long to start producing. That was the case at our last home. The deer here make it hard to get them going
short of using the hoops and fencing mesh over the top of them, as they browse them to the ground. Similar protection for what we do for our
strawberries. We grow garlic in our planters on the deck. Onions and carrots did not fare as well in the 3 foot long hanging baskets with the
coco fiber baskets that one puts the dirt in. Not deep enough. Our carrots do nicely in the garden , if I till the soil very deep to loosen it and mix
some rich compost in with the garden dirt.

As far as our large local herd of deer, I have planted two rather large food plots for them to give them something other than our garden to browse
on. Sweet clovers, and a bunch of our plants they love to browse on. 5 or 6 kinds of plants. This keeps them out of a garden a little longer, and
also gives me picture taking opportunities. They exit our woods every afternoon heading toward a hay field next door that the neigbor harvest for
feeding his beef cattle which are delicious. We buy at least a 1/4 a year from him and have the butcher shop in town process it for us. Cheaper
than the store and much tastier.

We also love the butternut squash. We were getting up to 4. On our acorn squash, we were getting 8 or more. With the squash, one of our simpler
recipes is cutting them in half from top to bottom, putting a table spoon or more of butter in each half along with a heaping tablespoon of brown sugar.
A half hour to an hour depending on the size. Yummy.

570 to 600 garlics is enough for a few lifetimes. We go through around 10 a year. A little goes a long way.
 

belleswell

In Bloom
I only use our compost pile, which is huge, in our veggie garden. I use a riding mower on our yard which is about 3 1/2 acres. The first cutting of grass clippings is done after our dandelions are finished flowering for our pollen gathering friends, bees.

As the summer progresses, I add layers of filamentous algae skimmed off our pond. I spend around 4 to 5 hours per week skimming algae from the pond, and by adding to the compost pile it helps the composting process as digging down into it gets to some very warm mix. In the fall, again with the riding mower and bagger system, I add a bunch of leaf mulch. Of course we throw in some garden refuse over the year as well, although I sure we should toss more of the garden refuse into the mix. The following year, a few wheel barrels full of the composted stuff gets spread around in the garden before It gets tilled into the soil along with the composted manure. I believe the algae in my situation is the key to the composting process.

For a couple years, it was just a spot to dump the grass clippings from mowing our huge yard, and then once I started adding the algae in layers, discovered it worked wonders in our veggie and fruit trees garden. For the last year, I've been adding shells from Hamilton Farms roasted peanuts onto the pile. We buy 25 lb boxes of roasted peanuts in the shell for the squirrels and birds. Hand crushed egg shells and coffee ground are kept separate and actually applied when planting. Small amounts on the ground by each starting plant in the garden, including the fruit trees. Over the course of a year, we save about 3 one gallon ziplock bags of coffee grounds, and 2 one gallon bags of hand crushed egg shells.

I’ve never used any of this composted material inside, just our garden, but having seen the results of what it does for our veggie garden, I've given it some serious thought.

Chickadees are fearless and love a free handout in the winter months.
Roasted shelled peanuts. I even get an occasional tufted titmouse landing
on my hand for the same.
1bmDTfYh.png

SvSqtqEh.jpg
 

belleswell

In Bloom
This is a list of two feebay sellers on two recent orders.

The order from Southeastseeds should be here at by the end of the week.
I bought from them last year and the germantion rate was as good as it gets
That's why I placed another order from them this year. Decent prices as well.

Here is what a little over $ 70 got me from Southeastseeds. The cost
would have been higher but they give a discount based on buying multiple
items. I got a $17 dollar discount with this order.

1 Florida Giant Watermelon seeds 1/8 oz or around 25 seeds $3.29
2 Homestead Tomato seeds 50 seeds $1.69
3 Watermelon seeds, citrullus lanatus 25 seeds $1.69
4 Buttercup Winter Squash seeds 1/8 oz or around 20 seeds $3.29
5 Serrano Hot Chili Pepper seeds 50 seeds $1.79
6 Crimson Sweet Watermelon seeds 25 seeds $1.69
7 Blue Lake Bush Green Bean seeds 20 seeds $2.29
8 Sugar Ann Sweet Peas l lb or around 2200 seeds $18.99
9 Honeydew Green Flesh Melon seeds 25 seeds $1.69
10 Charleston Gray Watermelon Huge seeds 14 seeds $2.49
11 Pequin Chili Peppers seeds 50 seeds $2.09
12 Cocozelle Aucchini Summer Squash seeds 25 seeds $1.69
13 Yellow Sweet Spanish Onion seeds 250 seeds $1.69
14 Atomic Red Carrot seeds 300 seeds $1.69
15 Tendergreen Improved Bush Green Beans 20 seeds $3.29
16 Grand Rapids Lettuce seeds 600 seeds $1.69
17 Provider Bush Green Bean seeds 20 seeds $2.29
18 Italian Pepperoncini Pepper seeds 50 seeds $2.29
19 Habanero Pepper seeds 30 seeds $1.69
20 Marketmore 76 Cucumber sees 30 seeds $1.69
21 Michihili Chinese Cabbage seeds 300 seeds $1.69
22 Waltham Butternut Squash seeds 35 seeds $2.79
23 Florida Market Eggplant seeds 150 seeds $1.69
24 Green Globe Artichoke seeds 20 seeds $1.69
25 Hungarian Wax Hot Pepper seeds 50 seeds $1.69
26 Broccoli De Cicco seeds 250 seeds $1.69
27 Cayenne Large Red Thick Pepper seeds 50 seeds $1.69
28 Black Prince Tomato seeds 30 seeds $1.69
29 Black Beauty Zucchini seeds 25 seeds $1.69
30 Ghost Pepper seeds 25 seeds $2.79
31 California Wonder Bell Peppers Assort Colors 50 seeds $1.69
32 Table Queen Acorn Winter Squash seeds 15 seeds $1.69
33 Golden Acre Cabbage seeds 250 seeds $1.69
34 Imperator 58 Carrot seeds 600 seeds $1.69
35 Cayenne Long Red Thin Pepper seeds 50 seeds $1.69

Total $70.33


Here is a smaller order from Sungodown

1 Sweetie Cherry Tomato seeds 100+ seeds $2.00
2 Gourmet Salad Blend Lettuce seeds 500+ seeds $2.30
3 Crenshaw Melon Seeds 50+ seeds $2.00
4 Cantaloupe Seeds Hales Best 50+ seeds $2.20
5 Sweet Banana Pepper seeds 50+ seeds $2.00
6 California Wonder Bell seeds 100+ seeds $2.00
7 Green Bell Peppers Emerald Giant seeds 30+ seeds $2.65
8 Romanesco Broccoli seeds 300+ seeds $2.00

Total $17.15

For the $87 dollars I spent, we can easily make that and
then some any given Saturday at the Farmers Market in town.
It costs us $5.00 per week, any week we show up, for a table.
Worth it.
 
Last edited:

Willie

πŸ“ Crush Genetics πŸ“
It's kind of odd to see the Bobcat right behind the Coyote. Have you seen them together before? Maybe they share the spoils.
lol, I was not expecting to be filming a bobcat. The animal in the vid with him is a racoon. The camera shoots for 10 econds and the video prior it was just the racoon and it got real nervous right at the end, but stayed and the bobcat walked around. It's weird that bobs vid is so short too......I wanna see more, lol.
There is a house cat out there too, several possums and racoons and coyotes a plenty.............mice are a pita, setting the camera off. I hope to capture that cat on camera again.
 
Top Bottom