Does IR start photosynthesis???

Primal

In Bloom
So I’m a old schooler who didn’t use a lot of the new fangled technology available to us as growers until recently. One of the new things I’m using and trying is web cams to keep a cursory eye on the kiddies. Well I’ve done a little research regarding what these cams use for night vision which is InfraRed light or IR for short. What I’ve discovered is actually conflicting. On one hand all the experts say IR light does not induce photosynthesis YET growers have anecdotally noted that LED light boards that include IR diodes produce bigger flowers with tighter structure. So I ask you. What’s your experience with using web cams, specifically the night vision during flowering???
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I wouldn't use one with IR. It's light that plants can see. Does it do anything to them using it at night? That seems to be the debate, but the fact is plants can "see" IR. So why introduce an unknown to see something that is rather uneventful, bordering on anti-climactic? Day? Maybe. Night? Nah.


I finally ditched in-room/in-tent cams and focused on using them as external security cams/motion detectors instead.
I have images shot to all my devices and several cloud sites for redundancy, anytime there is motion in my house when I am not home.


That's just me. I just found the novelty wore off very quickly and actual security became more important in my eyes.
 
I think it can help in flower ,but the amount of ir that boards have aren't enough to do anything noticable. Jmo
Yeah I wonder about these IR UV additions. I don't see any noticeable difference between the tents that have them and the one tent that doesn't, other than the one tent that doesn't has fatter buds than all them lol......so yeah, I dunno about those things lol
 

Primal

In Bloom
So I did a little research and according to a lighting expert with “The Green Sunshine Company” they actually use IR lights in modern commercial grows to help plants “go to sleep”. Now the ones he was referring to are a lot more powerful than something like a web cam or security cam. According to him the security IR lights are not powerful enough to trigger any form of reaction from plants. So they’re safe.
 

Primal

In Bloom
I'm willing to anecdotally attest to overall improvement in growth, using a combination of CMH with white based LED, vs the LED standalone areas.
I revere CMH.
I’ve read everything from they cause hermies, they cause photosynthesis, they don’t cause photosynthesis, etc. Sometimes just going to the source is the best thing to do. I will say I do not use them in flower. I know what I’ve been told by an expert. But, in my mind if I don’t need them (once in flower I’ve learned the plant so everything is on cruise control and dialed it. I don’t need to watch it as closely.) why use them? I may change my mind on that on my next grow. It’s a whole different ballgame when you’re doing several tents and many girls going.
 

Frimpong

🔥Freak.genetics🔥
I’ve read everything from they cause hermies, they cause photosynthesis, they don’t cause photosynthesis, etc. Sometimes just going to the source is the best thing to do. I will say I do not use them in flower. I know what I’ve been told by an expert. But, in my mind if I don’t need them (once in flower I’ve learned the plant so everything is on cruise control and dialed it. I don’t need to watch it as closely.) why use them? I may change my mind on that on my next grow. It’s a whole different ballgame when you’re doing several tents and many girls going.
I like the idea of the plant having different spectrums readily available throughout its life. I started using HPS and LED in combination and get great results. Sorry if I am hijacking. But just wanted to share
 

Saro01

In Bloom
I’ve read everything from they cause hermies, they cause photosynthesis, they don’t cause photosynthesis, etc. Sometimes just going to the source is the best thing to do. I will say I do not use them in flower. I know what I’ve been told by an expert. But, in my mind if I don’t need them (once in flower I’ve learned the plant so everything is on cruise control and dialed it. I don’t need to watch it as closely.) why use them? I may change my mind on that on my next grow. It’s a whole different ballgame when you’re doing several tents and many girls going.
I took this from the book "Marijuana cultivation reconsidered" by Read Spear. Great book, I highly recommend it to all who have not checked it out. Hopefully this helps. There's more if you're honestly interested. But the TLDR; answer is yes, far red definitely effects phytochromes.
There is a group of five light-sensitve pigments in plants called phytochromes. They respond chemically to light. Two forms of phytochromes are used for growth regulation and signaling. One form is sensitive to red light (in the 660 nm wavelength) and another is sensitive to far-red light (in the 730 nm wavelength). They are known by shorthand: Pr and Pfr. The two forms or isomers convert rapidly from one to the other. Pr converts to Pfr when it is struck by red light. Pfr is converted to Pr when it is struck by far-red light. In the dark, Pfr converts back into Pr. Those three rules make for a simple but fascinating mechanism for regulating plant growth. This mechanism is what is referred to by plant scientists as the Hourglass Model.
 

Saro01

In Bloom
Sorry I meant to include this part as well about the experiment, useful if you a situation with a light leak or whatever, sorry early and brain isn't working.

In the 1940's it was discovered that a flash of light during the skotophile phase prevented flowering in short-day plants.51 52 What this tells us is that the length of uninterrupted darkness is critical, not length of light. Thus, scientists deduced that florigen is created by long-night plants during the skotophile phase and that it degrades during the photophile phase, which explains why interrupting the photophile phase is not harmful but interrupting the photophobe phase
More experiments were conducted--this time, using different light colors. It was then hypothesized that red light during the skotophile phase will convert the newly (and spontaneously) created Pr back into Pfr instantly, and prevent the plant from flowering.53 But--and here's the kicker--a second flash of light (this time a far-red light so that the plants are exposed first to a flash of red and then to a flash of far-red during the dark period) will undo the damage! In other words, the far-red flash corrects the first interruption. (The lag time varies by species.) In fact, you can do this as many times as you like. If you finish with a flash of red light, long-night plants will not flower (but short-night plants will). If you finish with a flash of far-red light, long-night plants will flower (despite the interruption), but short-night plants will not.54 Called photoreversibility, this phenomenon does have its limits. If too much time elapses between flashes, the plant is said to have "escaped from photoreversibility" and it can no longer be influenced thusly.55
 

Saro01

In Bloom
I’ve read everything from they cause hermies, they cause photosynthesis, they don’t cause photosynthesis, etc. Sometimes just going to the source is the best thing to do. I will say I do not use them in flower. I know what I’ve been told by an expert. But, in my mind if I don’t need them (once in flower I’ve learned the plant so everything is on cruise control and dialed it. I don’t need to watch it as closely.) why use them? I may change my mind on that on my next grow. It’s a whole different ballgame when you’re doing several tents and many girls going.
I also found this article from fluence. Pretty interesting read. Hope the link works.
 

Saro01

In Bloom
I like the idea of the plant having different spectrums readily available throughout its life. I started using HPS and LED in combination and get great results. Sorry if I am hijacking. But just wanted to share
Hey frim, hope all is well my brotha. Thought you'd also get a good read out of this as well. Take care my man.
 

Saro01

In Bloom
I like the idea of the plant having different spectrums readily available throughout its life. I started using HPS and LED in combination and get great results. Sorry if I am hijacking. But just wanted to share
I also was registered for that webinar in the article. I have the link to the recording of it. Hit my up if you're interested in watching it. I believe it's an hour or something. Can't remember off hand. Take care brotha.
 

Inferno Mike

In Bloom
I took this from the book "Marijuana cultivation reconsidered" by Read Spear. Great book, I highly recommend it to all who have not checked it out. Hopefully this helps. There's more if you're honestly interested. But the TLDR; answer is yes, far red definitely effects phytochromes.
There is a group of five light-sensitve pigments in plants called phytochromes. They respond chemically to light. Two forms of phytochromes are used for growth regulation and signaling. One form is sensitive to red light (in the 660 nm wavelength) and another is sensitive to far-red light (in the 730 nm wavelength). They are known by shorthand: Pr and Pfr. The two forms or isomers convert rapidly from one to the other. Pr converts to Pfr when it is struck by red light. Pfr is converted to Pr when it is struck by far-red light. In the dark, Pfr converts back into Pr. Those three rules make for a simple but fascinating mechanism for regulating plant growth. This mechanism is what is referred to by plant scientists as the Hourglass Model.
That's a really solid book, I second the recommendation. Cuts through the superstition in the science parts. I don't agree with his growing preferences, necessarily, but he gets the plant science correct.
That said, I don't think the IR cameras are a significant enough source of light to cause a real problem.
 

Saro01

In Bloom
That's a really solid book, I second the recommendation. Cuts through the superstition in the science parts. I don't agree with his growing preferences, necessarily, but he gets the plant science correct.
That said, I don't think the IR cameras are a significant enough source of light to cause a real problem.
You know, I've never done any experiments with the cameras. And I do agree with you about Read in his book. I look at it like this, we should all be growing in our own style, the science should be your foundation to make the correct decisions, but how you implement them is a personal preference. One of the things I love about growing cannabis.
 
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