Enoki - Flammulina velutipes

Deebs

The Sentient Naturewalker
Staff member
Moderator
So I wanted to start a place here since I inoculated a couple of spawn bags with a white enoki LC.
Some things im reading:

parameters
The spawn-run environment is high in humidity (90-100%) and an increased amount of CO2.
The temperature is about 72-77° F.
When the mycelium has permeated the growing medium, pinning is induced by lowering the temperature to 50-55° F, and decreasing the amount of CO2 by 80-90%

They like cooler temperatures
Sawdust Lover
High CO2 environment I think primarily to stretch the stipe on purpose? paper cones around bottles i see?

Lets see if this even gets through colonization successfully.

Any thoughts or information feel free to post up.
 

macsnax

Pollen Slinger
So I wanted to start a place here since I inoculated a couple of spawn bags with a white enoki LC.
Some things im reading:

parameters
The spawn-run environment is high in humidity (90-100%) and an increased amount of CO2.
The temperature is about 72-77° F.
When the mycelium has permeated the growing medium, pinning is induced by lowering the temperature to 50-55° F, and decreasing the amount of CO2 by 80-90%

They like cooler temperatures
Sawdust Lover
High CO2 environment I think primarily to stretch the stipe on purpose? paper cones around bottles i see?

Lets see if this even gets through colonization successfully.

Any thoughts or information feel free to post up.
I'm sure colonization will be fine bud, I've found that to be about the easiest part. Out of close to 30 spawn jars, I've only had one fail to contam. You got this shite 👊
 
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Deebs

The Sentient Naturewalker
Staff member
Moderator
(Information taken from Paul Stamets: Growing Gourmet and Medicinal Mushrooms)

The Japanese lead in popularizing this mushroom. In the wild, Flammulina velutipes is a short, furry footed mushroom. Usually cultured in chilled growing rooms, abnormally small caps and long stems are achieved by elevating carbon dioxide levels and limiting light exposure. This unnatural shape makes the harvesting of Enoki easy.

Mycelial Characteristics: White, longitudinally linear, becoming finely appressed and tinged light brown to spotted with golden yellow brown zones with age. The surface roughens, resembling fine sand paper, and sometimes becomes beaded at the earliest stage of primordia formation. Long stemmed, small capped mushrooms commonly form along the inside periphery of the petri dish or during cold storage of culture slants.

Microscopic Features: This mushroom produces white spores.

Suggested Agar Culture Media: Potato Dextrose Yeast Agar (PDYA), Malt Yeast Agar (MYA), Oatmeal Yeast Agar (OMA), or Dog Food Agar (DFA).

Spawn Media: Grain (rye, wheat, sorghum).

Substrate for Fruiting: A wide variety of hardwoods (oak, alder, poplar, cottonwood, aspen, willow, birch, beech, etc.), and some softwoods (Douglas Fur) although the latter is, in general, less productive. The pH range for fruiting falls between 5-6. Enokitake also grows on a wide variety of paper products.

Yield Potential: Biological efficiency rating to 150%, the preponderance of which is stem mass. If grown in 1 liter bottles, yields of 3-5 oz. are standard for the first flush.

---Growth Parameters---

Spawn Run:

  • Incubation Temperature: 70-75° F (21-24° C)
  • Relative Humidity: 95-100
  • Duration: 14-18 days
  • CO2: >5000 ppm
  • Fresh Air Exchanges: 0-1
  • Light Requirements: n/a
Primordia Formation:

  • Initiation Temperature: 45-50° (7-10° C)
  • Relative Humidity: 95-100
  • Duration: 3-5 days
  • CO2: 2000-4000 ppm
  • Fresh Air Exchanges: 2-4 per hour
  • Light Requirements: 100-200 lux
Fruitbody Development:

  • Temperature: 50-60* F (10-16* C)
  • Relative Humidity: 90-95
  • Duration: 3-5 days
  • CO2: 2000-4000 ppm
  • Fresh Air Exchanges: 2-4 per hour
  • Light Requirements: 100-200 lux.
Cropping Cycle:

  • Two to three crops, 10-12 days apart.
Comments: This mushroom is the classic example of the influences light and carhon dioxide have on fruitbody formation. Like Oyster mushrooms, this mushroom's appearance is contingent upon the environment in which it was grown. The growing room environment can be tuned to elicit the perfect crop. Over time, experienced growers can orchestrate flushes with precision and generate cluster-bouquets of golden mushrooms. Properly managed, each bundle achieves a remarkably similar weight.

Under outdoor conditions (moderate light/low CO2), this mushroom is short-stemmed with caps as wide as the stems are long. The lower regions of the stem develop a darkened fuzz, hence the common name "The Velvet Foot". Under the lighted, high carbon dioxide conditions, the stems greatly elongate and are yellow to white in color. The caps remain relatively small. While CO2 determines the length of the stem, light is an overriding factor in influencing the formation and development of the cap. Thus under high CO2 and no light conditions, thin stems may form usually without any caps. Most strains behave in this fashion but responses vary. Depending on the surrounding environment, the stems can be as short as 1 inch to as long as 12 inches. The cap to stem ratio varies from 1:1 to 1:100. This range in the shape of the fruitbody is remarkable.

The surface mycelium undergoes a radical transformation during the period of pre-primordia formation. The mycelium yellows, and then forms dingy, blemished brown and white zones, which soon evolve into a roughened, beaded surface. From this micro-landscape, a high population of minute, squat, yellow primordia emerge. The mushooms appear virtually stemless. If carbon dioxide levels are kept elevated, above 5,000 ppm., significant stem elongation continues. Japanese cultivators have invented the technique of fruiting in bottles that are topped with a cylindrical insert of clear plastic or paper. The cylinder pools carbon dioxide and the stems elongate. This technique encourages the formation of highly uniform flushes of mushrooms in each bottle.
 

Deebs

The Sentient Naturewalker
Staff member
Moderator
So it looks like I am going to need to start planning the substrate for these. From what I am reading the masters mix is the way to go. 50/50 hw sawdust/soy hulls then some gypsum., but then started thinking about wheat bran instead. Since soy hulls are slower to colonize i read, and have bad 2nd flush results..never mind you need to soak them for 24 hours....I think the bran is winning.. mix a 1lb spawn bag in each 5lb block, am going to fruit in the bag off the block, cutting just the very top off the bag i think for co2 deprivation so the stapes stretch. Prolly have a few more weeks of colonization to iron this out.
 

macsnax

Pollen Slinger
Kinda funny I called your enoki "noodle" mushrooms. Just realized the other day that's what they call certain cordyceps. The dude I follow that's breeding them calls his crew the noodle gang lol
 

Deebs

The Sentient Naturewalker
Staff member
Moderator
They are going to be a challenge for sure looking at their parameters. They are super good though man. I would suggest you try it. If I get them to run, Ill send you some fresh overnight. Id like to get a tissue culture, or something from most of what I am running. Especially ones with vigor.
 
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Deebs

The Sentient Naturewalker
Staff member
Moderator
Still thinking about how I'm going to fruit these..they are looking good.. definitely want to get a culture off these. Whatever it is I need to get off my ass and figure it out!!

20200622_180048.jpg20200622_180123.jpg
 

Deebs

The Sentient Naturewalker
Staff member
Moderator
Can't wait to fruit and eat these mushrooms..wife is planning a curry hot pot for the mix I plan to have ..

Slow but moving..these were the first bags I ever innoculated. I did this towards the center of the bag before I knew better.
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jpcyan2

In Bloom
Getting closer. They are sure taking their sweet time. Probably though, the temps will be more suited to fruiting these by the time they are ready to go.

Keep updating, good stuff. :)
 
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