What are you reading?

Deebs

The Sentient Naturewalker
Staff member
Moderator
Being a somewhat avid reader, I thought it would be interesting to share some of what people are reading. We have a music thread, but I think this could turn out interesting.

I'll start currently I am reading:

Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge and the Teachings of Plants
Amazon product
As a botanist, Robin Wall Kimmerer has been trained to ask questions of nature with the tools of science. As a member of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation, she embraces the notion that plants and animals are our oldest teachers. In Braiding Sweetgrass, Kimmerer brings these two lenses of knowledge together to take us on “a journey that is every bit as mythic as it is scientific, as sacred as it is historical, as clever as it is wise” (Elizabeth Gilbert).

Drawing on her life as an indigenous scientist, and as a woman, Kimmerer shows how other living beings―asters and goldenrod, strawberries and squash, salamanders, algae, and sweetgrass―offer us gifts and lessons, even if we've forgotten how to hear their voices. In reflections that range from the creation of Turtle Island to the forces that threaten its flourishing today, she circles toward a central argument: that the awakening of ecological consciousness requires the acknowledgment and celebration of our reciprocal relationship with the rest of the living world. For only when we can hear the languages of other beings will we be capable of understanding the generosity of the earth, and learn to give our own gifts in return.
 
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Gentlemancorpse

Cannabis Chaotician
This is an amazing thread idea. Shit like this is what separates phenohunter.org from those OTHER forums. People here can read.

I'm that guy thats always reading too many books at once. I'm at various stages in Robert Heinlen's "Stranger in a Strange Land", Cixin Liu's "The Three Body Problem" (the first Asian novel to ever win the Hugo Award!) and Philip K Dick's "Valis" (shoutout to @Hoselover Fat) for the first time, also re-reading Ursala K Leguin's "A Wizard of Earthsea", Mervyn Peake's "Titus Groan" and "The Eternal Frontier" by Tim Flannery (the clear outlier in this list, a natural history of North America by one of my absolute favorite naturalists).

Just finished William Gibson's "Neuromancer" and "Burning Chrome" as well as the first 6 Drizzt Do'urden books by R.A Salvatore.
 

Deebs

The Sentient Naturewalker
Staff member
Moderator
This is an amazing thread idea. Shit like this is what separates phenohunter.org from those OTHER forums. People here can read.

I'm that guy thats always reading too many books at once. I'm at various stages in Robert Heinlen's "Stranger in a Strange Land", Cixin Liu's "The Three Body Problem" (the first Asian novel to ever win the Hugo Award!) and Philip K Dick's "Valis" (shoutout to @Hoselover Fat) for the first time, also re-reading Ursala K Leguin's "A Wizard of Earthsea", Mervyn Peake's "Titus Groan" and "The Eternal Frontier" by Tim Flannery (the clear outlier in this list, a natural history of North America by one of my absolute favorite naturalists).

Just finished William Gibson's "Neuromancer" and "Burning Chrome" as well as the first 6 Drizzt Do'urden books by R.A Salvatore.
Wow man quite the list there! I have that same problem especially technical material...where i tend to cross reference and draw correlations between 3-5 pieces of material. Drives my wife nuts..do you need all those books out? I do need a change, and jump into fiction. Last thing in fiction was probably the "Unicorn Project", as it parallel's a lot of the challenges currently facing technology departments in large organizations due to the automation and digitization that comes along with machine learning and AI. ~
 

Gentlemancorpse

Cannabis Chaotician
Wow man quite the list there! I have that same problem especially technical material...where i tend to cross reference and draw correlations between 3-5 pieces of material. Drives my wife nuts..do you need all those books out? I do need a change, and jump into fiction. Last thing in fiction was probably the "Unicorn Project", as it parallel's a lot of the challenges currently facing technology departments in large organizations due to the automation and digitization that comes along with machine learning and AI. ~

That sounds fascinating...another one to add to the list haha.

Obviously, I'm heavy into fiction! Especially fantasy and science fiction. I've been trying to escape from reality since I learned to read haha. I'm actually trying to read more nonfiction but I've been struggling to get into anything, hence re-reading something I know I like with Tim Flannery.
 

GCG

CHOOSE YOUR TITLE
@Schwaggy P recommended The Secret Life of Plants a while back. I had never read it and when I did it freaked me out. Literally reread entire chapters to my wife I was so astonished.
 

DreamsOfDiesel

In Bloom
I'm mostly a fiction reader but I can get into some nonfiction too. Currently rereading these 2 basic books (trying to memorize plant issues so I can quit looking stuff up lol). 15935032553035233999623546138161.jpg

I read almost anything but prefer historical (ie people of the earth or clan of the cave bear series) or fantasy (ie wheel of time or sword of truth series) or horror type stuff (dean koontz, laurell hamilton, etc) or detective/cop stuff (robert parker, tony hillerman). Ok, I'll stop now
 
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