American Big Bud Strain Information

Deebs

The Sentient Naturewalker
Staff member
Administrator
Moderator
This pack was donated to the preservation project by J. James. Much appreciated.

Provenance @J. James has shared.
American Big Bud (F6) is Afghani X Skunk #1
This line was given to my father in 86' from a buddie of his that was living & growing in Jacksonville, FL.
I was told that it was the Dutch who mixed it with Northern Lights and the result was a sweeter more humidity tolerant strain but overall a less resinous plant and that happened in the early 90's.

For this plant to give you the legendary colas its known for you need to drop your humidity below 40% by the second week of flower. Tie or double scrog the plant to support the weight and super crop the bottom half of the plant so you can get airflow up threw the canopy. Even though she is a huge yielding plant and sensitive to humidity, she is not demanding of nutrients and easy to overfeed. If you loose your lower fan leaves early in flower your yield will suffer. This is one strain I recommend minimal defoliation and really your goal should be to keep as many fan leaves as you can as they will be used as backup storage when the plant bulks up the last 3 weeks of flower. She flowers in 7 - 9 weeks and is easy to clone.
 

Gentlemancorpse

Cannabis Chaotician
Staff member
Moderator
LoL-. dude name is so commercial.
It remand me of some cash crop mids weed..
That's actually exactly where it originates from. Big bud comes from an era where the average yields were much lower and strain names were based off actual traits, like Panama Red was weed from Panama with red hairs. Big bud was 100% bred to be a high yielding strain for producers. Home growing wasn't really a common thing back then, and there weren't really commercial growers either because it was illegal. There was just suppliers and dealers, and they both made more money if the strains they grew yielded more, with less effort, while still maintaining a good quality. And since there was no internet, calling it Pinky Headband Sapsucker wouldn't have been very helpful, because no one would know what to expect. If you called it Big Bud, everyone knew what they were getting. The American version was developed in the 70s originally, but the strain became far more popular after it was smuggled into the Netherlands, and even won the Cannabis Cup in 1989, but as mentioned above, the Dutch altered the strain to be a sweeter tasting version before that.

I remember growing Big Bud crosses in the early 2000s, but at that point it was mostly used as a building block to increase the yield of other strains and it was kind of viewed as exactly what you describe, a kind of mediocre strain primarily for large scale suppliers. Dealers would call it other names because they didn't want the exact reaction you just had lol. They'd call it Skunk or Northern Lights or whatever. You'd grow it to sell, while you grew something more interesting for your head stash. It was still better than 90% of the weed that was available anywhere outside of California though.

And since then I've come to appreciate the nuance of some of these older strains. A lot of them hold up really well. Personally I'm really excited to see what this looks like, I've never seen pre-Dutch era Big Bud myself.
 

Skunky Dunk Farms

Cannabinoid Receptor
That's actually exactly where it originates from. Big bud comes from an era where the average yields were much lower and strain names were based off actual traits, like Panama Red was weed from Panama with red hairs. Big bud was 100% bred to be a high yielding strain for producers. Home growing wasn't really a common thing back then, and there weren't really commercial growers either because it was illegal. There was just suppliers and dealers, and they both made more money if the strains they grew yielded more, with less effort, while still maintaining a good quality. And since there was no internet, calling it Pinky Headband Sapsucker wouldn't have been very helpful, because no one would know what to expect. If you called it Big Bud, everyone knew what they were getting. The American version was developed in the 70s originally, but the strain became far more popular after it was smuggled into the Netherlands, and even won the Cannabis Cup in 1989, but as mentioned above, the Dutch altered the strain to be a sweeter tasting version before that.

I remember growing Big Bud crosses in the early 2000s, but at that point it was mostly used as a building block to increase the yield of other strains and it was kind of viewed as exactly what you describe, a kind of mediocre strain primarily for large scale suppliers. Dealers would call it other names because they didn't want the exact reaction you just had lol. They'd call it Skunk or Northern Lights or whatever. You'd grow it to sell, while you grew something more interesting for your head stash. It was still better than 90% of the weed that was available anywhere outside of California though.

And since then I've come to appreciate the nuance of some of these older strains. A lot of them hold up really well. Personally I'm really excited to see what this looks like, I've never seen pre-Dutch era Big Bud myself.
Big Bud, Acapolco Gold, Panama Red, Bolivian Blue, Columbian Gold and Skunk #1. Edit! Forgot one, the Thai sticks.
All from the 70's into early 80's and never been a time like it since!
These are coming on line very soon.
 
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Psychobilly

🧀Muenster
I just know it's one of the 20+ foot trees if grown outside like a Skunk #1

Oh wow ! I have heard people saying that huge plants aren't high quality, but I personally feel like that's dumb as the plant is going to grow and grow as long as it's getting what it needs, and some genetics simply are massive (There's a strain in Africa that easily gets 16 feet without any human messing around) and Grease Monkey would be another that gets massive literally by just letting it loose outside. Motor Breath too actually haha.

Skunk #1 man.... I'm rooting for you on getting an oldschool terpene profile back in that, and me having a chance to grow the REAL thing some day. I still remember smelling what I thought was a Skunk....It was back in the late 80s or early 90s in Southeast Michigan, and I was outside, and smelled what I thought was a Skunk that had sprayed, and a family member said simply "That's not a Skunk" but didn't really go into detail (I was young and they probably had no intention of explaining that it was a plant that would get you arrested back then) but I remember it even now LOL.

I'm ..... I'm not sure why I'm SO interested by strains that "stink" but I guess stink is in the nose of the sniffer ? Because I also remember sitting in my bedroom at night playing video games or whatever I was doing, and smelling a Skunk while my window was open, and.... I liked it LOL. People would scared of Skunks because if they spray you.... And there I was like 8 years old thinking a Skunk didn't really smell so bad, and quite liking the scent of Gasoline (I used to love loading gas in the Lawn Mower and get a nice whiff of it.... I didn't huff it or anything but I did like the smell).

And yes, at the same age, I did in fact go sniff Limburger Cheese a lot. LOL. I've always been intrigued by smells VS taste, and in particular, sniffing things others were horrified by haha.
 

Hokusai

In Bloom
Oh wow ! I have heard people saying that huge plants aren't high quality, but I personally feel like that's dumb as the plant is going to grow and grow as long as it's getting what it needs, and some genetics simply are massive (There's a strain in Africa that easily gets 16 feet without any human messing around) and Grease Monkey would be another that gets massive literally by just letting it loose outside. Motor Breath too actually haha.

Skunk #1 man.... I'm rooting for you on getting an oldschool terpene profile back in that, and me having a chance to grow the REAL thing some day. I still remember smelling what I thought was a Skunk....It was back in the late 80s or early 90s in Southeast Michigan, and I was outside, and smelled what I thought was a Skunk that had sprayed, and a family member said simply "That's not a Skunk" but didn't really go into detail (I was young and they probably had no intention of explaining that it was a plant that would get you arrested back then) but I remember it even now LOL.

huge plants are (hopefully) getting a real chance to express themselves, instead of being restricted by space, lighting, nutrients, and mainly other plants. i personally love to run huge singles at home, point being 1 of my honkers will typically always have more potent flower than if i grew 5 of the same in same space. same yield, sometimes more.

same bud of mine who has the headband from 90s also has skunk #1 being preserved at a research facility, plus SSH. same time frame, so the skunk should be "his" skunk that we all coveted back then. trying like hell to get my hands on all of the genes he's got. im in queue, and will be happy to share if and when.
 

Hokusai

In Bloom
Isn't Big Bud one of the parents of Grand Daddy Purple?

Makes sense that Skunk would be in the genetics, given my experience with Cheese. I don't think I've ever seen a low yielding Cheese. Thank God.

GDP is purple urkel x "salmon creek" big bud everywhere it's listed. if you were running the ken estes reg packs, im not sure what you were getting in reality, but his clone was good. GDP I have experience with is a speedy finisher, would not be GDP without the density and growth structure big bud brings to urkel.
 
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