Freak Chunk (Deep Chunk) IBL

Deebs

The Sentient Naturewalker
Staff member
Moderator
This is a 12 pack that was purchased from therealseedcompany.com for the pHenohunter preservation project.

Freak Chunk (Deep Chunk)

Description

Genetics: ‘Deep Chunk’ (Californian – Afghan Hindu Kush)
Type: Pure Indica-type
Indoors: c. 56 days
Outdoors: September
Classification: C. sativa subsp. indica var. afghanica

This is a Spanish continuation of the original Tom Hill Deep Chunk, a renowned true-breeding Indica-type strain with roots in the Afghan Hindu Kush. Work has been done to remove weak plants and ‘mutants’. The original landrace from which Deep Chunk was inbred is said to have been introduced to Northern California in the late 1970s. Crucially, it’s believed to have never been outcrossed.

Deep Chunk is known for its fast flowering time, thick stems, short internodes, and excellent resin production. It’s a classic Indica that produces copious leaves and broad leaflets. Buds are dense and yield earthy, herbal aromas, including hashy pine, citrus, coffee, and chocolate. A weakness is its susceptibility to botrytis. A strength is its knock-down potency.

True-breeding for many traits, this is an archetypal Indica that’s earned a reputation as an excellent breeding plant. In an era when Cannabis genepools are becoming ever-increasingly homogenized through hybridization, pristine inbred lines such as this should be in the collection of every serious grower and breeder.

Keeping heirlooms in their pure form over the coming decades is a wise choice that is sure to benefit both people and plant.

NOTE: Initial testing of this batch of seeds has shown +90% viability. Incidentally, plants from which this batch was produced showed strong uniformity across the population.
 

Frimpong

🔥Freak.genetics🔥
This is a 12 pack that was purchased from therealseedcompany.com for the pHenohunter preservation project.

Freak Chunk (Deep Chunk)

Description

Genetics: ‘Deep Chunk’ (Californian – Afghan Hindu Kush)
Type: Pure Indica-type
Indoors: c. 56 days
Outdoors: September
Classification: C. sativa subsp. indica var. afghanica

This is a Spanish continuation of the original Tom Hill Deep Chunk, a renowned true-breeding Indica-type strain with roots in the Afghan Hindu Kush. Work has been done to remove weak plants and ‘mutants’. The original landrace from which Deep Chunk was inbred is said to have been introduced to Northern California in the late 1970s. Crucially, it’s believed to have never been outcrossed.

Deep Chunk is known for its fast flowering time, thick stems, short internodes, and excellent resin production. It’s a classic Indica that produces copious leaves and broad leaflets. Buds are dense and yield earthy, herbal aromas, including hashy pine, citrus, coffee, and chocolate. A weakness is its susceptibility to botrytis. A strength is its knock-down potency.

True-breeding for many traits, this is an archetypal Indica that’s earned a reputation as an excellent breeding plant. In an era when Cannabis genepools are becoming ever-increasingly homogenized through hybridization, pristine inbred lines such as this should be in the collection of every serious grower and breeder.

Keeping heirlooms in their pure form over the coming decades is a wise choice that is sure to benefit both people and plant.

NOTE: Initial testing of this batch of seeds has shown +90% viability. Incidentally, plants from which this batch was produced showed strong uniformity across the population.
Sounds like my kind of strain!
 

Manidoo

In Bloom
Subbed! If anything can remain true it will be the Deep Chunk! I've always enjoyed the beautiful leaf machine it's known for and it's really good to see more preservation of this Jurassic like beast! In the mixes with DC it's rare to see it combine with much of anything being one of the most selective combining types I've worked. Even when Deep Chunk combines it tends to disappear in the F2's from my experience. But most times not , When outcrossed it just makes more Deep Chunk due to its sheer dominance.
 

YardG

In Bloom
Nice!

I hope y'all don't mind if I ask a tangentially related question in this thread: the listing for Freak Chunk mentions they worked to remove mutants and weak plants but also talks about the importance of preserving the gene pool... don't those two things, to a certain degree, run counter to each other, at least when you're talking about mutants? You remove parents, you narrow the gene pool, no?

I'm asking because I popped a pack of Petrolia Headstash I bought from RMS back in 05 or 06 in order to do a preservation run. From forum descriptions I knew to expect some variation, and indeed there is some in the 9 seedlings that pulled through germination and breaking soil. There are also a few mutants, including one that's growing superweird that I might ditch under normal circumstances, but which I plan to keep, because genes are genes, and heavy selection can be done on the offspring of these plants. I'd rather have to sift through undesirable plants down the line than risk losing some quality that wasn't obvious based on visual appearances. If it all turns out to be junk, no big loss.

Any thoughts?
 

Manidoo

In Bloom
Nice!

I hope y'all don't mind if I ask a tangentially related question in this thread: the listing for Freak Chunk mentions they worked to remove mutants and weak plants but also talks about the importance of preserving the gene pool... don't those two things, to a certain degree, run counter to each other, at least when you're talking about mutants? You remove parents, you narrow the gene pool, no?

I'm asking because I popped a pack of Petrolia Headstash I bought from RMS back in 05 or 06 in order to do a preservation run. From forum descriptions I knew to expect some variation, and indeed there is some in the 9 seedlings that pulled through germination and breaking soil. There are also a few mutants, including one that's growing superweird that I might ditch under normal circumstances, but which I plan to keep, because genes are genes, and heavy selection can be done on the offspring of these plants. I'd rather have to sift through undesirable plants down the line than risk losing some quality that wasn't obvious based on visual appearances. If it all turns out to be junk, no big loss.

Any thoughts?
In my perspective it's critical to retain everything in an open pollenation initially without culling anything. After this though, I love to pick and choose my favorites for a personal open poll seed stash.
 

Skunky Dunk Farms

Cannabinoid Receptor
Nice!

I hope y'all don't mind if I ask a tangentially related question in this thread: the listing for Freak Chunk mentions they worked to remove mutants and weak plants but also talks about the importance of preserving the gene pool... don't those two things, to a certain degree, run counter to each other, at least when you're talking about mutants? You remove parents, you narrow the gene pool, no?

I'm asking because I popped a pack of Petrolia Headstash I bought from RMS back in 05 or 06 in order to do a preservation run. From forum descriptions I knew to expect some variation, and indeed there is some in the 9 seedlings that pulled through germination and breaking soil. There are also a few mutants, including one that's growing superweird that I might ditch under normal circumstances, but which I plan to keep, because genes are genes, and heavy selection can be done on the offspring of these plants. I'd rather have to sift through undesirable plants down the line than risk losing some quality that wasn't obvious based on visual appearances. If it all turns out to be junk, no big loss.

Any thoughts?
I have a few thoughts.
When i get home.
 

Skunky Dunk Farms

Cannabinoid Receptor
Nice!

I hope y'all don't mind if I ask a tangentially related question in this thread: the listing for Freak Chunk mentions they worked to remove mutants and weak plants but also talks about the importance of preserving the gene pool... don't those two things, to a certain degree, run counter to each other, at least when you're talking about mutants? You remove parents, you narrow the gene pool, no?

I'm asking because I popped a pack of Petrolia Headstash I bought from RMS back in 05 or 06 in order to do a preservation run. From forum descriptions I knew to expect some variation, and indeed there is some in the 9 seedlings that pulled through germination and breaking soil. There are also a few mutants, including one that's growing superweird that I might ditch under normal circumstances, but which I plan to keep, because genes are genes, and heavy selection can be done on the offspring of these plants. I'd rather have to sift through undesirable plants down the line than risk losing some quality that wasn't obvious based on visual appearances. If it all turns out to be junk, no big loss.

Any thoughts?
Yes i agree initally none should be culled, perhaps unless a true freak appears.
I hope this is what they are trying to say.
When i run 12 they all will play their part on the first round.
I had a somewhat freak in the Skunk #1 run i just finished, but in the end it could not be distinguished from the rest.
 

YardG

In Bloom
Thanks for the feedback, that was what I thought, but it's always good seeking input from more knowledgeable people.

In 05 or so I had stoney daydreams about doing a Petrolia Headstash x Deep Chunk cross, but they were both pretty expensive packs (for me anyway) and I never got around to picking up the Deep Chunk. I did pick up a pack of Stawberry Hill's Chunk D a few years ago though, so you never know. Will be fun watching the Freak Chunk repro.
 
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