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Bruno8437

In Bloom
The LRS 350-36 drivers are made by Mean Well and available through the normal channels (Digi-key, LED Supply, Amazon, etc.).

They work great, wiring is in parallel, no light flickering and they run cool to the touch. The only drawback is that if you want to dim the lights you need to add a PWM module ($10-$12).
 

ricky_simples

In Bloom
What’s the best deals out there on led lighting to cover a 4x4 or 5x5 area?

I'm going to piss some people off by saying this, but IMO Kingbrite LED's are still the best bang for your buck. I just completed a DIY build utilizing SM561C strips and it was still 30%+ more expensive to build it myself versus had I bought a Kingbrite. I'm not complaining, the DIY light kicks ass, but so does the Alibaba light that I paid 70 cents per watt to buy (fully assembled).
 
Got a question for the LED guys, was lookin at the HLG site at the 260w QB V2 kit. Would I be able to upgrade to the 288 V2 R Spec boards later on with the same driver?
The website is the truth. They explain it pretty clearly that they dont recommend combining r spec v2 with regular v2 even
The LRS 350-36 drivers are made by Mean Well and available through the normal channels (Digi-key, LED Supply, Amazon, etc.).

They work great, wiring is in parallel, no light flickering and they run cool to the touch. The only drawback is that if you want to dim the lights you need to add a PWM module ($10-$12).
Why do,I have to wire in parallel?
Whats the little knob do on the end of the lrs driver?
 
I was hasty in my question and looked at the specs. If and when I upgrade it was gonna be both boards at once on the two board kit. Was probably gonna do half the flower room at a time to see the difference in the R SPEC. But that would be end of the year, I know they will have different boards out by then but I move at my own pace.
 

Bruno8437

In Bloom
The website is the truth. They explain it pretty clearly that they dont recommend combining r spec v2 with regular v2 even

Why do,I have to wire in parallel?
Whats the little knob do on the end of the lrs driver?

In a parallel circuit, the voltage across each of the components is the same, and the total current is the sum of the currents flowing through each component.
So parallel wiring the 4 boards to the LRS 350 -36 (36V at 9.7A)l gives each board 36V and 2.4A (~80W). If you wired in series, you would exceed the current rating for the boards by about 4x and probably let the smoke out.

The little knob on the lrs driver lets you fine tune the output voltage from 32.4 - 39.6V (+/- 10%)
 
In a parallel circuit, the voltage across each of the components is the same, and the total current is the sum of the currents flowing through each component.
So parallel wiring the 4 boards to the LRS 350 -36 (36V at 9.7A)l gives each board 36V and 2.4A (~80W). If you wired in series, you would exceed the current rating for the boards by about 4x and probably let the smoke out.

The little knob on the lrs driver lets you fine tune the output voltage from 32.4 - 39.6V (+/- 10%)
I wired each of my other lights in series. No problems. I think the additove voltage problem appears on the 500v connectors on each board. @JL2G am I wrong?
I just wanna know series is additive in what ways?
 

JL2G

🅱️🆒️🚹
Staff member
Q-36 Space Modulator
I wired each of my other lights in series. No problems. I think the additove voltage problem appears on the 500v connectors on each board. @JL2G am I wrong?
I just wanna know series is additive in what ways?
How you wire it mostly depends on the type of driver your using. I'll only touch on some of the tech stuff as it can go pretty in depth.
-A CV driver controls the voltage, and is best ran with parallel wiring unless you really know your electrics. It will put out a set voltage, and the led will draw the current it needs to use at that V.
-A CC driver controls the current, and is best ran in series, again unless you really know your toys. Lol.
It will put out a set current to the led, and the V will adjust itself based on current being used.

4 qb 132 boards in series on a CV driver would not ruin anything, it just would not function.
In series yes the fv of each led is added up to act as one large led.
IE: four 36v leds in series would act as a 144v led and would be way underpowered by a 36v driver and therefore not work. Where as in a parallel setup they all remain as separate 36v circuits, and work as planned.
I could also take three 12v leds in series to act as one 36v led, and then do 4 of the series circuits in parallel on a 36v CV driver.

Now a CC driver will push out a set current level, let's say 2100 ma is what our driver will run at.
So any led board/boards I hook up will get that 2100 ma when ran in series, and the V will be adjusted according to the leds draw.
Now if I run it as parallel wiring it would divide the current available by the # of circuits. Say 4 boards would then get 550ma each.

And just fyi, the board connectors are only rated at 300v, and 9 amps. In a parallel setup there's no worries of exceeding that safety. In a series setup though where the V does add up it can limit what is safely able to be ran.
IE: six 54v boards in series, (54 × 6 = 324v) would be overloading the connectors limits, and become a potential fire hazard. Wire needs to be specced too for V rating of 300+.
Hope that explains it some. Lol.
 
How you wire it mostly depends on the type of driver your using. I'll only touch on some of the tech stuff as it can go pretty in depth.
-A CV driver controls the voltage, and is best ran with parallel wiring unless you really know your electrics. It will put out a set voltage, and the led will draw the current it needs to use at that V.
-A CC driver controls the current, and is best ran in series, again unless you really know your toys. Lol.
It will put out a set current to the led, and the V will adjust itself based on current being used.

4 qb 132 boards in series on a CV driver would not ruin anything, it just would not function.
In series yes the fv of each led is added up to act as one large led.
IE: four 36v leds in series would act as a 144v led and would be way underpowered by a 36v driver and therefore not work. Where as in a parallel setup they all remain as separate 36v circuits, and work as planned.
I could also take three 12v leds in series to act as one 36v led, and then do 4 of the series circuits in parallel on a 36v CV driver.

Now a CC driver will push out a set current level, let's say 2100 ma is what our driver will run at.
So any led board/boards I hook up will get that 2100 ma when ran in series, and the V will be adjusted according to the leds draw.
Now if I run it as parallel wiring it would divide the current available by the # of circuits. Say 4 boards would then get 550ma each.

And just fyi, the board connectors are only rated at 300v, and 9 amps. In a parallel setup there's no worries of exceeding that safety. In a series setup though where the V does add up it can limit what is safely able to be ran.
IE: six 54v boards in series, (54 × 6 = 324v) would be overloading the connectors limits, and become a potential fire hazard. Wire needs to be specced too for V rating of 300+.
Hope that explains it some. Lol.
Well shit. That's why I could run the others in series. Thanks,man. This dc is toufh to wrap my head around when ive been AC for so many years. I got bits of this in college but that was a while ago hahah
 

JL2G

🅱️🆒️🚹
Staff member
Q-36 Space Modulator
Well shit. That's why I could run the others in series. Thanks,man. This dc is toufh to wrap my head around when ive been AC for so many years. I got bits of this in college but that was a while ago hahah
Lol, I've been dicking with dc stuff since I was a kid, learned alot more as an adult.
Started learning AC doing construction as a teenager working with and for my uncles. It was an in house do all aspects of the job kind of company. 9 uncle's. Lol.
So ya kinda had to learn all of it.
 
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