Pheno hunting blueberry regular seeds. Lots of off colour leaf growth. Any tips?

Hi all
I popped some seeds of blueberry regular and have three plants showing colours and leaf degradation despite being otherwise happy.
I am treating these plants as I would all my others and without many nutes yet because they are recently from seed.
But as I start to feed them more, are there any tips from the community on how to treat this strain or the needs of plants showing these traits.
#1 very yellow all over plant. But healthy otherwise
#2 kinda blotchy first growth but turning to healthy growth that then turns a little blotchy but with healthy new growth

It's a very squat plant with tender leaves.
Unfortunately I only have these three blueberry so I want to take good care of them.

They seem happy just very different from the plants they are around.

Story of my life lol.
 

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Frimpong

🔥Freak.genetics🔥
Hi all
I popped some seeds of blueberry regular and have three plants showing colours and leaf degradation despite being otherwise happy.
I am treating these plants as I would all my others and without many nutes yet because they are recently from seed.
But as I start to feed them more, are there any tips from the community on how to treat this strain or the needs of plants showing these traits.
#1 very yellow all over plant. But healthy otherwise
#2 kinda blotchy first growth but turning to healthy growth that then turns a little blotchy but with healthy new growth

It's a very squat plant with tender leaves.
Unfortunately I only have these three blueberry so I want to take good care of them.

They seem happy just very different from the plants they are around.

Story of my life lol.
What are you feeding them with?
 

Jewels

Tilts at Tables
Middle photo looks like my plants, on tapwater.



" This however does not mean that Peat moss is chemically inert at this point as it does contain as a significant amount of substances that can affect your nutrient solution.

One main characteristic of peat is that it’s acidic. This means that the pH of untreated peat will usually be between 3 and 4.5, too low for use in hydroponic applications. Peat is generally amended with calcium carbonate (lime) to make its pH go up and remain there but this process can be ineffective if the peat can still decompose very significantly (if you buy peat with decomposition < H7). This also contributes high amounts of Ca into the media which might lead to nutritional problems if Ca is also applied normally in solution. To alleviate these issues peat is also sometimes treated with lime/dolomite mixtures so that the counter-ions are both Mg and Ca. Alternatively – but more expensively – this problem can be solved by using phosphate buffer solutions that are run through the peat for a significant period of time. A potassium monobasic/dibasic phosphate buffer at a pH of 6.5 with a 100 mM concentration can buffer the peat moss. For this the buffer needs to be applied until the run-off pH out of the peat comes out unchanged. Then tap water should be applied to remove the K/P from the media. Note that this will only work for black peat that’s already gone through most of the decomposition process as lighter peats will simply decompose further and acidify the media again.







However if all you can get is already treated peat moss then you should run nutrient solution through your peat for a while before putting your plants in to ensure that the peat’s cation exchange capacity has already balanced with your nutrient solution’s composition, this will also help remove nutrients applied to the peat that deviate the nutrient concentrations from what we want within the media. Peat can have a significant cation exchange capacity as showed in the table above – even more so for black peat – so a commercial source of peat may exchange a significant amount of nutrients with your solution. Peat is also not very good at retaining anions so the media will be unable to supply any N or P which will be leached very easily from the media. This inability to retain anions basically means that they will only be available when the plant is watered,"

Loosely translated ,

New soil will F with you.


I would say " C lock out" ,,,, and yet - I dont even know exactly what that means.
But, it is not a good thing , and it looks that.

Do you have any way to check the pH?
 
@Frimpong These plant have been fed a little bone and blood meal and Gaia green organic as well as some marines seaweed extract.
I have a bunch of seed plants of other strains and they all look completely fine
These blueberry all looked like this almost right away so it seems to be the varietals themselves driving the off colour and shotty leaf development. My thought was this strain of blueberry isn't very well bred or blueberry itself may be over dependant. I don't want to kill them off before I have a chance to make clones so I'm kinda babying them along.
As they mature I'll add more nutes but I'm not rushing these along.
Once I have some clones I can do some testing with nutes but I wanted to see if anyone has seen plants come out of the gate like this.

@Jewels i ph my water with phosphoric acid and baking soda so it's usually 5.5-5.7
I haven't been testing runoff because I've been keeping watering slow and low
 
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