Decision Chart - When to buy Harbor Freight Tools

My big issue with Harbor Freight is not being able to get parts for their stuff. I had their electric breaker hammer and it worked but when my crew broke the handle with the trigger there was virtually no way to get a replacement. Super annoying since otherwise it was fine. I actually wound up making a wood handle but obviously it didn't hold up long term lol. When I got sick of duck taping it back together I bought a Dewalt even though it was twice the money... wish I had just done that in the first place. Not only can I get replacement parts now from a local Dewalt and Milwaukee repair shop, it works twice as well so it's basically paying for itself at this point... I don't necessarily shop for the best, but I definitely try to make sure when I buy a tool it's repairable now. Even if it's cheaper I'm just sick of throwing things away because I can't repair them
The EU just passed a "right to repair" law that stipulates companies have to make items repairable.

Planned obsolescence was made popular in late 40s or 50s by companies like GE. They were upset refrigerators lasted 30+years so they started making parts breakable but not offer the parts for replacement. It took a while but the fad caught on and got to the point its at now.
 

HydroRed

3Thirteen Seeds
Staff member
The EU just passed a "right to repair" law that stipulates companies have to make items repairable.

Planned obsolescence was made popular in late 40s or 50s by companies like GE. They were upset refrigerators lasted 30+years so they started making parts breakable but not offer the parts for replacement. It took a while but the fad caught on and got to the point its at now.
Exactly! Its like lightbulbs back in the early's 1900's were made to virtually last forever. Theres a bulb in a California fire station claimed to be like 100+ years old and has only been turned off a small handfull of times -that is still burning bright to this day. A group of shareholders of those vintage light companies decided to form "Phoebus" in the mid 1920's since theres no fortune in products with longevity and began designing light bulbs with 1000 hr "duty cycles" as to ensure folks are forced to purchase new bulbs frequently.
 
Exactly! Its like lightbulbs back in the early's 1900's were made to virtually last forever. Theres a bulb in a California fire station claimed to be like 100+ years old and has only been turned off a small handfull of times -that is still burning bright to this day. A group of shareholders of those vintage light companies decided to form "Phoebus" in the mid 1920's since theres no fortune in products with longevity and began designing light bulbs with 1000 hr "duty cycles" as to ensure folks are forced to purchase new bulbs frequently.
Sigh, planned obsolescence, I love my HF 20 ton press. It sits opposite the hub's big red Snap On Roll Away. I digitized his tool receipts, suffice to say I'll never feel guilty for any purchase I make ever again; $1500 LED, absolutely, $20,000 sewing machine, of course. I'm shopping press plates, without guilt ;)

PS I love my HF sagittal saw too (it deserved honorable mention)
 
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